A report conducted by one of America’s top health officials has concluded that E-cigarettes pose a serious risk of cancer, and should be kept way from children.

The devices expose users to 10 known carcinogens and the nicotine contained in E-cigarettes is as addictive as the nicotine in normal cigarettes and can harm the developing brains of teenagers.

The report concluded that they represented a step back in the fight against tobacco.

Here in the UK E-cigarettes currently fall out of the scope of smoke free legislation and it is up to employers to decide whether or not to ban them in the workplace.

E-cigarettes are often used as part of a plan to stop smoking and support should be given to employees in these cases. But banning them from the workplace may force the users to use the device outside – where the smokers of real cigarettes congregate, potentially hindering their progress.

If employers allow the use of E-cigarettes in the workplace then consideration of others will need to be taken into account. The vapour they produce may annoy other employees, as well as the potential health risks they pose. What about customers or visitors who could mistake the E-cigarettes for real ones?

Employers need to be clear about their rules on the use of E-cigarettes and include them in their smoking or drugs and alcohol policies. It may be beneficial to consult with staff and representatives to ensure that everyone understands what the rules are and why they have been implemented, as well as the consequences of not adhering to company policy.

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